Tag Archives: cottage in muskoka

**NOW SOLD Upscale Muskoka Home. Palmer Estates, Gravenhurst

A wonderful, upscale Muskoka Home for sale for empty nesters, or young families alike, this property is recently listed in a wonderful neighbourhood in Gravenhurst. Close to Lake Muskoka in the Palmer Estates subdivision, with walking trails and beaches, this is the perfect place to call both home and getaway. Oversized lot with large back yard overlooks an environmentally protected greenbelt…

Muskoka Home for saleSold
Residential

**NOW SOLD Upscale Muskoka Home for sale. Gravenhurst

458 Alexander St
Gravenhurst, ST

  • 4Beds
  • 3Baths
  • 2150/4720Square Feet

** Now Sold!** Muskoka Cottage for sale, Walker’s Point 625’ frontage!

Here’s an opportunity to have your own Muskoka cottage on such a  large level, Lake Muskoka waterfront property, and for much less than you would expect.

Sought after Walker’s Point locale with over 600 feet of frontage, ready for your designer’s dream. Over 2 acres of level land with a south exposure  and views straight out on quiet Shanty Bay. A Muskoka cottage with a property this large and level can take on many appearances, subject only to your imagination; from a quiet private sanctuary to a sprawling family compound with lots of activities and guests.

Existing 2 bedroom year round cottage to enjoy, update or expand while you envision your dream build. Build onto the existing structure or start from scratch using this large footprint. Possible 2 storey boathouse subject to development approval. This property has excellent potential, with easy year round access, to be a great 4 season home or cottage.

 

 

For more information follow this link. For a private tour, please use the contact form to the left. We would be delighted to show you this really nice Lake Muskoka property.

 

 

Copyright © 2015 cottageinmuskoka.ca, All rights reserved.

Cottage in Muskoka Blog, gallery of header images

For those who have more critical things to do than refresh our Blog Page just to see different header images, I have had a request to add a gallery page.  After all time is better spent looking at Muskoka cottages for sale.

Hey, thanks for the request, we like them too … and, here it is:

As we go about looking at Muskoka cottages for sale for our buyers, and listing cottages for sellers, we get some great comments about our images, design and videos. They are fun to share and with Muskoka as our backdrop, it’s pretty easy to look good.

Some are images taken throughout a lifetime of cottaging here in Muskoka. I am told I started at two weeks old, and at some point later the first sentence I put together was an excited and agitated “boy go boat!!!” when others were headed out while I was to be left in the care of my Grandmother.

Other pictures are taken of friends and clients’ cottage activities and, as mentioned above, as we go about searching for Muskoka cottages for sale (actually and potentially for sale), that fit both our ideals for value and the various specifics of our current group of buyers.

There are quite a few images, more or less suitable to headline the blog, and we have lots more in the archive. One that I had mostly forgotten was a photo of the ritual where I had convinced tried to convince our kids, that kissing fish you caught and were releasing was good luck. Somehow it would encourage the released fish to spread fairly positive communication about the entire event. I took the picture when I noticed with delight, that our daughter Lenore carried on the same tradition with her cousin Jordan. This turns out perhaps, to be something of an accepted practice of anglers around the globe. However, a Wikipedia search for kissing a fish, only brings up Kissing Gouramis .

Here’s a list of commercial fishing superstitions:

• Don’t leave a hatch cover upside down.
• Don’t whistle on board.
• Don’t bring a suitcase or a black bag on board.
• Don’t bring a banana on board.
• Don’t even wear yellow.
• Don’t allow women on board.
• Don’t leave port on a Friday.
• Don’t mention four-hooved animals (pigs, horses, etc.).
• Hang coffee mugs with the opening facing inboard.
• Don’t comment on good luck, or the possibility of bad luck.
• Dolphins are a good omen. Sharks are a bad omen.
• Don’t kill an albatross or a gull.
• Don’t change the name of a vessel.
• Leaving on Sunday is good luck.
• Don’t wear green. (It makes the boat seek land.)
• Don’t say “rabbit.” (No clue.)
• If you meet a minister before sailing, turn around and go home.
• Hang garlic over the galley port hole.
• Don’t use blue paint (particularly on a lobster boat).
• Don’t wear a hat in the galley.
• Don’t step onto a boat with your left foot.
• Don’t coil a rope or stir a pot counter-clockwise.
• Don’t bring an umbrella on board.
• Don’t make pea soup.
• Toss the first fish back. (Or kiss it.)
• Don’t use the number 13.
• Turn starboard first after backing away from the dock.
• Don’t bring honeybears on board.
• Having a virgin pee on a new net is good luck.

(Courtesy of Matthew Hutson,  article here.)

Muskoka’s Lakes: The Calcium Story

Dr. Watmough explains  implications of calcium losses on lake ecosystems.
Dr. Watmough explains implications of calcium losses on lake ecosystems.

As mentioned last month in this cottageinmuskoka blog entry and this news story from the Huntsville Forester (Cottage Country Now), the decline of calcium in our lakes can affect our lakes recovery from acid rain as well as zooplankton in our lakes, which are are very sensitive to declining calcium levels.

From the Muskoka Watershed Council Lecture Series I have just finished editing and have just posted this video on the Muskoka Watershed Council’s YouTube page.

This is interesting information of value not only for those who own a cottage in Muskoka, but all of us who live in or visit Muskoka. In the presentation Dr. Shaun Watmough of Trent University helps us understand:

Why should we care about calcium in the environment?

How are calcium levels in lakes, vegetation and soils changing?

What is causing these changes?

What will be the impact of timber harvesting on lake calcium levels?

What are the critical uncertainties?

Declining calcium slows the recovery of acidic lakes.
Declining calcium slows the recovery of acidic lakes.

 

 

Reminder: The Great Muskoka Paddling Experience is this Saturday!

Even if you aren’t paddling in the event, it’s an … ahem… Great Experience to watch.
This Saturday, at Annie Williams Park in Bracebridge, come out and see why The Great Muskoka Paddling Experience has become an epic one in Ontario paddling and beyond.

https://vimeo.com/76351898

The Great Muskoka Paddling Experience generously supports the work of the Muskoka Watershed Council. Past cottageinmuskoka.ca post, and here are some additional links to published articles on the event:

– Muskoka Watershed Council media release: story
– Town of Bracebridge media release: story
– What’s Up Muskoka : story
– Muskoka Magazine: story  (scroll down a page).
– Bracebridge Weekender: story

Timber harvesting and the health of our lakes: The Calcium Story

©www.cottageinmuskoka.ca
©www.cottageinmuskoka.ca

Mentioned in a number of Muskoka Watershed Council lectures over the past few years, calcium decline in Muskoka Lakes and in particular, the consequences of timber harvesting on lake calcium levels have been hinted at as a potential direct cause of declining health of our lakes in Muskoka. Here’s a past primer news story from the Huntsville Forester (Cottage Country News).
This week, we have an opportunity to discover more.

Dr. Shaun Watmough, an Associate Professor in the Environmental Resource Science Program at Trent University in Peterborough will present.
Here is a synopsis of the lecture:
Decades of acid deposition have depleted soil calcium reserves and, when combined with timber harvesting, predicted losses of calcium from soil are considerable and may ultimately threaten long-term forest health and productivity and lead to negative impacts on lakes.
In this talk, Dr. Watmough will provide an overview of our current understanding of calcium biogeochemistry and describe the reasons for the widespread decline in calcium levels in lakes and the implications of calcium losses on soil fertility and forest health in addition to impacts on lake ecosystems.
With an emphasis on south central Ontario, Dr. Watmough will document a nutrient budget for a selection harvesting regime in central Ontario hardwood forests. This work is then extrapolated to regional harvesting activities and management issues are discussed.

The lecture is this Thursday, October 10, 2013 from 7:00 – 9:00 pm at Nipissing University – Muskoka Campus, 125 Wellington Street, Bracebridge, P1L 1E2. As always, admission is by donation

The link for this lecture and registration is here.

The Great Muskoka Paddling Experience

I’ve just finished post-processing and editing this video for the Great Muskoka Paddling Experience. This event, held annually on the Saturday of the Thanksgiving weekend is a great opportunity for anyone – even if you don’t have a canoe or kayak, you can rent one there – to get out on the water for perhaps the last time of the year. It was a fun video to shoot and create and I hope it captures just how much fun the event can be.

The Great Muskoka Paddling Event benefits the Muskoka Watershed Council and helps give them a bit more of a budget to do important work. It’s a really well organized event and fun for all ages, and all levels of paddling experience.

Why don’t you try it this year?

GMPE_Flyer_v2

Muskoka and Global: Environmental Good News Stories.

Did you know that Gravenhurst Bay in Lake Muskoka is 4 to 5 times cleaner than it was 1970?
Did you know that everyone alive in the 70’s had toxic levels of lead in their blood?
Did you know that Muskoka has only half as many acid lakes as it once did?
Well, how about this then: if it wasn’t for the life in lakes, we would all be blind, deaf , stupid and dead.

Dr. Norman Yan
To be blunt; we would all be blind, deaf , stupid and dead if it wasn’t for the life in lakes.

From the Muskoka Watershed Council Lecture Series I have just finished editing and have just posted this video on the Muskoka Watershed Council’s YouTube page.
Dr. Norman Yan, an extremely engaging speaker, revisits some past environmental successes, what we have learned and the steps we need to take to solve today’s environmental problems.

Phosphorous is the conrolling factor in eutrophication.

Learn how the reduction of phosphorus resulted in a clean up in Gravenhurst Bay while the International Joint Commission was still debating whether its carbon or phosphorus that spikes algal growth? This local Muskoka cleanup helped convince the world that phosphorus is the cause of cultural eutrophication. This phenomena is of increasing concern as population grows and the climate heats up; after all, we learned from this lecture, that algae really love heat.

Current photo of lake in China where people swim in an algal bloom.
Current photo of lake in China where people swim in an algal bloom.

Revisit the change to unleaded gas which got the toxic levels of lead out of our blood. Dr. Yan also discusses the many benefits of the ban on DDT, as well as the immediate benefits of the recent Ontario ban of cosmetic pesticides and herbicides. Also be sure not to miss houses disappearing from view as the Sudbury environment improves over 40 years!

Muskoka. Our environment is far more than our economy.

From the Muskoka Watershed Council Lecture Series I have just finished editing and have just posted this video on the Muskoka Watershed Council’s YouTube page.

All of us should be familiar with the fact that in Muskoka, our environment is our economy; over half our GDP comes from tourism and cottaging. In this lecture, Peter Sale attempts to convince us that our environment is far more than our economy.
sale

Every year some 5 billion cubic metres of water pass through Muskoka – that’s 3 1/2 times the entire volume of Lake Muskoka. Half is evaporated or transpired by Muskoka’s forests and plants, the other half – some 2.5 billion cubic metres flows into Georgian Bay. As climate change affects Muskoka – producing warmer and wetter winters, but dryer summers with more intense storms – we may be trying to find ways to hold on to that water, just a little longer; maybe the beaver has a solution for us.

wetlands 5

Peter, who describes himself as a strange, but harmless ecologist, talks about some of the many creatures in Muskoka including the beaver, the expected effects for Muskoka from climate change, an idea or two on solutions, and that there are other ways of valuing our environment other than simply to value it as a storehouse of resources to dig up and take away.

Relationships matter. What makes selling cottages in Muskoka worthwhile.

We received some kind words of praise yesterday from a couple who bought a cottage we had listed.

I am not surprised because I know how much Catharine cares about doing the right thing for all customers, but it is really wonderful when people stop and take the time to let us know!

“We can’t thank you enough for all you have done for us in our search for the perfect cottage. You have gone above and beyond what is expected of an agent.  You were extremely patient with us and not pushy at all when we were scared and undecided about purchasing our cottage.  After spending hours in the freezing cold during the lengthy building inspection you still remained up beat, positive and always had a smile on your face…..You always responded to our e-mails and phone calls (and there were many) within hours.  Answered all of our questions, and when you didn’t have the answer hopped in your car drove to the township office to get the answers.  You gave us many valuable reference for the best trades people.
 
My mother always told me, to be successful in business you need a good lawyer and accountant. I now believe that a good real estate agent is on that list of people required to be successful.  And you are the best in the business!
 
Thanks”

Thank you so much for your kind comments. Some other client comments are here.